Gender and Song in Early Modern England

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Professor Katherine R Larson, Professor Leslie C Dunn
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., Nov 28, 2014 - Literary Criticism - 236 pages
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Song offers a vital case study for examining the rich interplay of music, gender, and representation in the early modern period. This collection engages with the question of how gender informed song within particular textual, social, and spatial contexts in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Bringing together ongoing work in musicology, literary studies, and film studies, it elaborates an interdisciplinary consideration of the embodied and gendered facets of song, and of song’s capacity to function as a powerful-and flexible-gendered signifier. The essays in this collection draw vivid attention to song as a situated textual and musical practice, and to the gendered processes and spaces of song's circulation and reception. In so doing, they interrogate the literary and cultural significance of song for early modern readers, performers, and audiences.

 

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Contents

Performing Women in english Books of ayres
15
Tracing
31
The early Modern Soundscapes
47
Song Fooling
63
Cupid in early Modern Pedagogical Masques
77
reforming and Gendering Music
93
The Sweet descants of Mary Sidney
107
domestic Song and the Circulation of Masculine Social energy
123
Song Political resistance and Masculinity in Thomas heywoods
139
The Fitful Changes of Troilus and Cressida
153
The Use of early Modern Music in Film Scoring for elizabeth i
169
Select Bibliography
185
Index
209
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About the author (2014)

Leslie C. Dunn is Associate Professor of English at Vassar College, USA. Katherine R. Larson is Associate Professor of English at the University of Toronto, Canada.

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