General View of the Agriculture of the County of Lincoln

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W. Bulmer and Company, 1799 - Agriculture - 455 pages
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Page 21 - The tenants divide and plough up the commons, and then lay them down to become common again ; and shift the open fields from hand to hand in such a manner, that no man has the same land two years together ; which has made such confusion, that were it not for ancient surveys it would now be impossible to ascertain the property.
Page 17 - ... on the borders of commons, is inhabited by a farmer, the proprietor of his farm, of from four or five...
Page 408 - This land is divided into two plats; one of which is pasture for the cows in summer, and the other is kept as meadow land to provide hay for them in the winter. Each cottager knows his own piece of meadow land, and he lays upon it all the manure which he can obtain, in order that he may have the more hay. When one of the two plats of ground has been mown for two or three years...
Page 242 - U not probably a county in the kingdom that has made equal exertions in this very important work of draining. The quantity of land thus added to the kingdom, has been great; fens of water, mud, wild fowl, frogs, and agues, have been converted to rich pasture and arable, wonh Irora ios. to 40s. an acre. Health improved, morals corrected, and the. community enriched.
Page x - Contiguous to the sea, in the southern part, there spreads a great extent of low land, much of which was once marsh and fen ; but now become, by the gradual exertions of above 150 years, one of the richest tracts in the kingdom...
Page 75 - The vast benefit of enclosing can, upon inferior soils, be rarely seen in a more advantageous light than upon Lincoln Heath. I found a large range which formerly was covered with heath, gorse, &c., and yielding in fact little or no produce, converted by enclosure to profitable arable farms, let on an average at 10s.
Page 238 - Axholm, it will appear that there is not probably a county in the kingdom that has made equal exertions in this very important work of draining. The quantity of land thus added to the kingdom, has been great; fens of water, mud, wild fowl, frogs, and agues, have been converted to rich pasture and arable, worth Irom 2o/.
Page 239 - France, decrees issued for draining marshes: 1 do not ask, what progress has been made? but I would demand, if any drainages equal to this have been executed in that kingdom during a century ? From Bourdeaux to Bayonne, in one of the finest climates of Europe, nearly all is marsh. What Frenchman has been so actuated by the blessings of republican security, as to lay out one Louis on that or any other marsh or bog ? These...
Page 153 - Report At Swineshead, in Lincolnshire, where much Hemp is grown, it was formerly cultivated on the same spots year after year ; but now they spread it over a farm, accordingly as the soil suits or the price actuates ; and on some lands that are foul they sow it as a cleanser. If the soil is weak, they manure for it. It is ploughed first at Candlemas ; a second time at Lady-day ; and a third time about the middle or end of May, previous to sowing. At Haxey it is sown after wheat. Some plough before...
Page 233 - In that long reach of fen, which extends from Tattersal to Lincoln, a vast improvement by embanking and draining has been ten years effecting. The first act passed in 1787 or 1788 ; and, through a senseless opposition, an extent of a mile in breadth was left out, lest the waters should, in floods, be too much confined, and the other side of the river overflowed : better ideas, however, having taken place, a new act to take in to the river has passed.

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