General View of the Agriculture of the County of Cornwall

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G. and W. Nicol, 1811 - Agriculture - 192 pages
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Page iii - ... the AGRICULTURAL SURVEYS of the KINGDOM reprinted, with the additional communications which have been received since the ORIGINAL REPORTS were circulated, has induced the BOARD OF AGRICULTURE to come to a resolution of reprinting such as may appear on the whole fit for publication.
Page 184 - ... their merits, and of our acceptance of the same ; and to that end we do hereby render our royal thanks to that our County in the most public and lasting manner we can devise, commanding copies hereof to be printed and published, and one of them to be read in every church and chapel therein, and to be kept for ever as a record in the same; that as long as the history of these times and of this nation shall continue, the memory of how much that County hath merited from us and our crown, may be...
Page 184 - ... to all the world, and perpetuate to all time the memory of their merits, and of our acceptance of the same ; and to that end, we do hereby render our royal thanks to that our county, in the most...
Page iii - ADVERTISEMENT. THE desire that has been generally expressed, to have the AGRICULTURAL SURVEYS of the KINGDOM reprinted, with the additional Communications which have been received since the ORIGINAL REPORTS were circulated, has induced the BOARD OF AGRICULTURE to come to a resolution to reprint such as appear on the whole fit for publication.
Page 183 - To the inhabitants of the county of Cornwall. " We are so highly sensible of the merit of our county of Cornwall, of their zeal for the defence of our person, and the just rights of our crown, in a time when we could contribute so little to our own defence, or to their assistance ; in a time when not only no reward appeared, but great and probable dangers were threatened to obedience and loyalty ; of their great and eminent courage and patience in...
Page 183 - ... or to their assistance ; in a time when not only no reward appeared, but great and probable dangers were threatened to obedience and loyalty ; of their great and eminent courage and patience in their indefatigable prosecution of their great work against so potent an enemy backed with so strong, rich, and populous cities, and so plentifully furnished and supplied with men, arms, money, ammunition, and...
Page i - GENERAL VIEW of the AGRICULTURE of the COUNTY of CORNWALL. Drawn up and published by Order of the Board of Agriculture and internal Improvement. By GB WORGAN. " Let usgo and, cultivate the ground, that the poor as well as tlie rich nmy lie happy, und that peace and plenty may be established throughout our borders.
Page 140 - ... to be more easily ascertained, because when the milk is sufficiently scalded the pan throws up the form of its bottom on the surface of the cream. The brass pan, if almost as big at the bottom as at the top, gives no criterion to judge by but the appearance and texture of the surface of the cream, the wrinkles upon which become smaller and the texture somewhat leathery. In summer, it must be observed, the process of scalding ought to be quicker than in the winter, as in very hot weather, if the...
Page 11 - Cornwall, and as whiteacre in eastern Cornwall and part of Devon. Mr. Worgan, noticing the loose quartz fragments of various sizes dispersed over the surface in many parts of Cornwall, and that it may be sometimes profitable to remove them, states, that " Mr. James, of St. Agnes, cleared a large field of spar, by screening the whole mass of spar and earth, as deep as the yellow substratum, in the same manner as masons screen the earth for their mortar ; and the experiment answered well, although...
Page 14 - ... His queen, sensible of the calamities of the country, invited the king, her husband, to dinner, as he came home hungry from overseeing his workmen in the mines. She so contrived it, that the bread and meat were most artificially made of gold; and the king was much delighted with the conceit thereof, till at last he called for real meat to satisfy his hunger. Nay, said the queen, if you employ all your subjects in your mines, you must expect to feed upon gold, for nothing else can your kingdom...

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