Getting Better Bite by Bite: A Survival Kit for Sufferers of Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorders

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Routledge, Sep 25, 2015 - Bulimia - 168 pages

Getting Better Bite by Bite is an essential, authoritative and evidence-based self-help programmethat has been used by bulimia sufferersfor over 20 years. This new edition maintains the essence of the original book, while updating its content for today's readers, drawing on the latest knowledge of the biology and psychology of bulimia and its treatment. 

The book provides step-by-step guidance for change based on solid research. The use of everyday language, stimulating contemporary case study story-telling and evocative illustrations in Bite by Bite provide encouragement, hope and new perspectives for all readers.

This handy-sized book fills a need for easy-to-understand information about Bulimia Nervosa, a serious and prevalent eating disorder. Ulrike Schmidt and Janet Treasure are world-renowned researchers and authorities on eating disorders, and June Alexander, a former sufferer of anorexia and bulimia, is a respected writer and internationally-known eating disorder awareness advocate. Getting Better Bite by Bite is a valuable resource - for sufferers, for their families, and for the health professionals and carers treating them.

 

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About the author (2015)

Ulrike Schmidt is Professor of Eating Disorders at King's College London and a consultant psychiatrist in the Eating Disorders Unit at the Maudsley Hospital, London, UK. Her research covers all aspects of eating disorders, from causes to treatments. She has a particular interest in developing novel treatments, especially brief interventions that can be widely disseminated. She is the author of several popular self-help books and award-winning online therapy programmes.   

Janet Treasure, OBE, PhD, FRCP, FRCPsych, is a professor and a psychiatrist who works in research and teaching at King's College London and as a clinician at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust,( www.the.newmaudsleyapproach.co.uk). Professor Treasure's research interests include conjoint working with patients and carers using translational research to develop new forms of treatment.

June Alexander developed anorexia nervosa at age 11, an illness that challenged and shaped her life. A love of words became a survival tool. She kept a diary and developed a journalism career. Since 2006, June has applied lived experience and literary skills to write about eating disorders. A PhD candidate, June serves on Australian and international organisations, including AED, F.E.A.S.T. and NEDC. Her website: www.junealexander.com.

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