Grieving Beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Women Mourn, Revised Edition

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, Apr 2, 2010 - Psychology - 258 pages
0 Reviews
Grieving Beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Women Mourn is a revision of  Men Don’t Cry, Women Do: Transcending Gender Stereotypes of Grief. In this work, Doka and Martin elaborate on their conceptual model of "styles or patterns of grieving" – a model that has generated both research and acceptance since the publication of the first edition in 1999. In that book, as well as in this revision, Doka and Martin explore the different ways that individuals grieve, noting that gender is only one factor that affects an individual’s style or pattern of grief. The book differentiates intuitive grievers, where the pattern is more affective, from instrumental grievers, who grieve in a more cognitive and behavioral way, while noting other patterns that might be more blended or dissonant. The model is firmly grounded in social science theory and research. A particular strength of the work is the emphasis placed on the clinical implications of the model on the ways that different types of grievers might best be supported through individual counseling or group support.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2010)

Kenneth J. Doka, Ph.D., is a Professor of Gerontology at the Graduate School of The College of New Rochelle and Senior Consultant to the Hospice Foundation of America.

Terry L. Martin, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychology and Thanatology at Hood College, and maintains a private practice in Maryland.

Bibliographic information