Hand-book of Practical Cookery, for Ladies and Professional Cooks: Containing the Whole Science and Art of Preparing Human Food

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D. Appleton, 1867 - Cookery, American - 478 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
16
III
44
IV
61
V
97
VI
113
VII
125
VIII
162
X
202
XI
226
XII
237
XIII
276
XIV
305
XV
356
XVI
376
XVII
409

IX
184
XVIII
459

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Page 160 - Put in a pot some small slices of fat salt pork, enough to line the bottom of it; on that a layer of potatoes cut in small pieces; on the potatoes' a layer of chopped onions; on the onions a layer of tomatoes in slices, or canned tomatoes; on these a layer of clams, whole or chopped (they are generally chopped), then a layer of crackers. Season with salt and pepper, and other spices if desired. Then repeat this process, layer after layer, in above order, seasoning each, until the pot is full. When...
Page 160 - ... of tomatoes in slices or canned tomatoes ; on these a layer of clams, whole or chopped (they are generally chopped), then a layer of crackers. Season with salt and pepper and other spices if desired. Then repeat this process, layer after layer, in above order, seasoning each, until the pot is full. When the whole is in, cover with water, set on a slow fire, and when nearly done stir gently, finish cooking and serve. When done, if found too thin, boil a little longer; if found too thick, add a...
Page 178 - ... in small pieces, two small onions, salt and pepper. Lay the tongue on the whole ; wet with a glass of white wine and a glass of broth. Set it on a moderate fire and simmer about five hours, keeping it well covered.
Page 161 - Lay the clams on a rock, edge downward, and forming a circle, cover them with fine brush ; cover the brush with dry sage ; cover the sage with larger brush ; set the whole on fire, and when a little more than half burnt (brush and sage), look at the clams by pulling some out, and if done enough, brush the fire, cinders, etc., off; mix some tomato or cauliflower sauce, or catsup, with the clams (minus their shells) ; add butter and spices to taste, and serve.
Page 298 - We soon saw that we had been mistaken. He made a fire, took hold of the skunk by the head with one hand, and with a stick in the other held the skunk over the fire. He burnt off nearly all the hair, taking care to avoid burning the skin, commencing at the hind legs ; then with his hunting-knife he carefully cut off the bag containing the fetid matter, and skinned and cleaned it.
Page 2 - ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by D. APPLETON & CO.. In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York.
Page 178 - Lard the tongue with the fillets ; put in a sauce-pan two ounces of bacon cut in slices, four sprigs of parsley, two of thyme, a little garlic, two cloves, two carrots cut in small pieces, two small onions, salt and pepper. Lay the tongue on the whole ; wet with a glass of white wine and a glass of broth. Set it on a moderate fire and simmer...
Page 63 - Then skim off very carefully all the fat on the surface, pass the remainder through a strainer or a sieve, and it is ready for use. This broth is certainly very inferior to the preceding one, but it is excellent for sauces and gravies, and is very cheaply made. It may be used for potages also ; but, as we have said above, it is very gelatinous, and cannot be compared with the highly nutritious beef- broth. Broth that is not to be used immediately must be cooled quickly after being strained, as the...
Page 71 - Then put a tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan, set it on the fire, and when the butter is melted, put what is in the mortar in, stir with a wooden spoon for about ten minutes, then add one pint of warm broth, stir for about twenty minutes, and strain. Put the liquor back on the fire with about four ounces of toasted bread, boil five minutes, and mash through a colander. Put the liquor back again on the fire, add one quart of broth, boil gently ten minutes, and turn into the soup-dish. While it...
Page 164 - Some like more salt pork than others in the beef; the strips may be ran thickly or thinly. Then take a saucepan of a proper size for the piece of meat; it must not be too large or too small, but large enough to hold the meat without being obliged to bend or fold it ; a crockery pan is certainly the best for that purpose, and one that will go easily in the oven. Put in the saucepan, for six pounds of beef, half a calf...

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