Handbook of Alcoholism Treatment Approaches: Effective Alternatives

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Reid K. Hester, William R. Miller
Allyn and Bacon, 2003 - Psychology - 301 pages

The Handbook of Alcoholism Treatment Approaches is a comprehensive, results-based guide to alcohol treatment methods.This handbook surveys the various models that have been used to define alcoholism, ending with a discussion of what the authors call "an informed eclecticism." Using this approach, clinicians develop a spectrum of treatment approaches that have proved effective in practice, then match specific clients with the treatment methods that offer the greatest opportunities for success in these specific circumstances. This new edition of this handy reference provides both practitioners and researchers with a rich source of information on treatment interventions demonstrated to be the most successful.Clinical Psychologists and Alcohol Treatment Specialists.

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Miller & Hester could learn about teaching people the approach of taking responsibility for their actions instead of blaming "Some religious groups calling Terry a sinner ((Segal and Gerdes 2013).
Oh, the efficacy of this approach!

Contents

Toward an Informed Eclecticism
1
What Works? A Summary of Alcohol Treatment
13
Screening for AtRisk Problem and Dependent Alcohol
64
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About the author (2003)

Stephen Rollnick, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and Professor of Health Care Communication in the Department of Primary Care and Public Health at Cardiff University, UK. He practiced in a primary care setting for 16 years and then became a teacher and researcher on the subject of communication. Dr. Rollnick has written books on motivational interviewing and health behavior change, has published widely in scientific journals, and has taught practitioners and trainers in many countries throughout the world. y William R. Miller, PhD, is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico, where he joined the faculty in 1976. He served as Director of Clinical Training for UNM's American Psychological Association-approved doctoral program in clinical psychology and as Codirector of UNM's Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions. Dr. Miller's publications include 35 books and more than 400 articles and chapters. He introduced the concept of motivational interviewing in a 1983 article. The Institute for Scientific Information names him as one of the world's most cited scientists. y Christopher C. Butler, MD, is Professor of Primary Care Medicine and head of the Department of Primary Care and Public Health at Cardiff University, UK. He trained in medicine at the University of Cape Town and in clinical epidemiology at the University of Toronto. For his doctoral work, under the direction of Stephen Rollnick, he developed and evaluated behavior change counseling and conducted qualitative research into patients? perceptions of advice against smoking from clinicians. Dr. Butler has published more than 70 papers, mainly on health behavior change and common infections. He has a general medical practice in a former coal-mining town in south Wales.

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