A History of the Intellectual Development of Europe

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Harper & Brothers, 1863 - Europe - 631 pages
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Page 520 - Every body continues in its state of rest, or of uniform motion in a right line, unless it is compelled to change that state by forces impressed upon it.
Page 152 - With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.
Page 273 - Long life and victory to Charles, the most pious Augustus, crowned by God the great and pacific emperor of the Romans!
Page 499 - He was permitted to dine, with the family; but he was expected to content himself with the plainest fare. He might fill himself with the corned beef and the carrots : but, as soon as the tarts and cheesecakes made their appearance, he quitted his seat, and stood aloof till he was summoned to return thanks for the repast, from a great part of which he had been excluded...
Page 165 - He, having willed to produce various beings from his own divine substance, first with a thought created the waters, and placed in them a productive seed...
Page iii - Social advancement is as completely under the control of natural law as is bodily growth. The life of an individual is a miniature of the life of a nation.
Page 407 - ... destroy the births of women, and the increase of cattle ; they blast the corn on the ground, the grapes of the vineyard, the fruits of the trees, the grass and herbs of the field.
Page 520 - The change of motion is proportional to the motive force impressed; and is made in the direction of the right line in which that force is impressed.
Page 87 - Whence also he is all similar, all eye, all ear, all brain, all arm, all power to perceive, to understand, and to act; but in a manner not at all human, in a manner not at all corporeal, in a manner utterly unknown to us. As a blind man has no idea of colors, so have we no idea of the manner by which the all-wise God perceives and understands all things.
Page 512 - ... separation of the sun from the planets, with which he has so many affections in common, is likewise a harsh step : and the introduction of so many immovable bodies into nature, as when he makes the sun and...

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