Human Intelligence

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 22, 2010 - Psychology
This book is a comprehensive survey of our scientific knowledge about human intelligence, written by a researcher who has spent more than 30 years studying the field, receiving a Lifetime Contribution award from the International Society for Intelligence. Human Intelligence takes a non-ideological view of a topic in which, too often, writings are dominated by a single theory or social viewpoint. The book discusses the conceptual status of intelligence as a collection of cognitive skills that include, but also go beyond, those skills evaluated by conventional tests; intelligence tests and their analysis; contemporary theories of intelligence; biological and social causes of intelligence; the importance of intelligence in social, industrial, and educational spheres; the role of intelligence in determining success in life, both inside and outside educational settings; and the nature and causes of variations in intelligence across age, gender, and racial and ethnic groups.
 

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Contents

The Issue of Intelligence
1
The Tests
31
On Theory
64
Psychometric Theories
79
Taking Intelligence Beyond Psychometrics
111
The Mechanics of Intelligence
140
Intelligence and the Brain
172
The Genetic Basis of Intelligence
203
Environmental Effects on Intelligence
257
What Use Is Intelligence?
311
The Demography of Intelligence
356
Summary and Prospectus
448
References
453
Author Index
485
Subject Index
494
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About the author (2010)

Earl Hunt is Professor Emeritus at the University of Washington, where he has been a faculty member since 1966. He has also taught at Yale University, the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Sydney, Australia. His other books include Concept Learning (1962), Experiments in Induction (1966), Artificial Intelligence (1975), Will We Be Smart Enough? (1995), Thoughts on Thought (2002), and The Mathematics of Behavior (2007). He has received the International Society for Intelligence Research's Lifetime Achievement award for his contributions to the study of intelligence.

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