Human Rights: Concept and Context

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Broadview Press, May 23, 2002 - Law - 272 pages

Winner: 2002 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

What are human rights? What justifies us in believing we have them? What are rights-holders and duty-bearers? Who should bear the costs and responsibilities for making human rights real? Why have some criticized the human rights perspective? And how can those supportive of human rights best respond? These and other conceptual issues are discussed in full in the first part of this book. The second part offers a detailed account of how the human rights idea came to be such a powerful force in the contemporary world; it traces the evolution of human rights from their origins to their present position in our daily lives, in political struggles, and in both national and international law.

 

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Contents

A
241
B
259
Index
267
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Brian Orend, a professor in the department of Philosophy at the University of Waterloo, is also the author of War and International Justice: A Kantian Perspective and of Michael Walzer on War and Justice.

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