Illustrating BASIC

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1977 - Computers - 134 pages
To make a computer do a calculation, however simple, you must describe every step of that calculation in a language the computer can understand: this description is called a program. This book presents a popular and widely available language called BASIC and explains how to write simple programs in it.
 

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User Review  - MrJack - LibraryThing

From October 1978 to October 1979, Practical Computing magazine serialized this book, Illustrating BASIC by Donald Alcock. This book is unusually written by hand rather than typeset, and features ... Read full review

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John G. Kemeny and Thomas E. Kurtz of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, created BASIC to aid non-scientific/mathematical students to learn programming in 1964.
Alcock's hand written and
beatifully illustrated, spiral bound book is the epitome of that objective.
The book, serialised in Practical Computing, was a great start to programming; a work of art and still in print. My photocopy of the original series is now yellowing newsprint, dated 1978. I fished it out recently to re-discover some of the thrill I felt running his programs on the UK101, sadly emulated now only on a pc.
'Illustrating Computers (Without Much Jargon)' - is another of his works, dated now,
written in the same style, but with a clear, simple explanation of gates and addressing from transistor level up. Not in print anymore but available s/h from the usual sources.
 

Contents

POSING A PROBLEM O AN INTRODUCTORY EXAMPLE
2
STATEMENTS INSTRUCTIONS A REMARKS
8
DATA STATEMENTS AND READING FROM THEM
16
FUNCTIONS SQUARE ROOT LOG ETC
22
PRINT St THE MOST VERSATILE INSTRUCTION
28
PRINT USIN6 f MORE VERSATILITY
34
GO TO BREAKING THE USUAL SEQUENCE
40
ON GO TO THE MULTIWAY SWITCH
46
breaKdowns of populatIons another example
72
replacement fi a whole matrIx at a tIme
78
transposItIon s the rows turn Into columns
84
InversIon an IntroductIon to the concept
90
tnput of matrIces dont doIt from a KeYboard
96
s IllustratIng a sYmbolstate table
102
7 Commands and sIgnIng on
112
q ?Iles of data
120

GO SUB RETURN THE CONCEPT OF A SUBROUTINE
52
arraYs IntroducIng subscrIpted varIables
60
rIpple sort an example to Illustrate subscrIpts
66
SYNTAX O DEFINITION OF TXE WRITTEN FORM OF BASK
128
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