Illustrating BASIC

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1977 - Computers - 134 pages
To make a computer do a calculation, however simple, you must describe every step of that calculation in a language the computer can understand: this description is called a program. This book presents a popular and widely available language called BASIC and explains how to write simple programs in it.
 

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User Review  - MrJack - LibraryThing

From October 1978 to October 1979, Practical Computing magazine serialized this book, Illustrating BASIC by Donald Alcock. This book is unusually written by hand rather than typeset, and features ... Read full review

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John G. Kemeny and Thomas E. Kurtz of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, created BASIC to aid non-scientific/mathematical students to learn programming in 1964.
Alcock's hand written and
beatifully illustrated, spiral bound book is the epitome of that objective.
The book, serialised in Practical Computing, was a great start to programming; a work of art and still in print. My photocopy of the original series is now yellowing newsprint, dated 1978. I fished it out recently to re-discover some of the thrill I felt running his programs on the UK101, sadly emulated now only on a pc.
'Illustrating Computers (Without Much Jargon)' - is another of his works, dated now,
written in the same style, but with a clear, simple explanation of gates and addressing from transistor level up. Not in print anymore but available s/h from the usual sources.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
2
Section 2
3
Section 3
4
Section 4
5
Section 5
6
Section 6
7
Section 7
8
Section 8
9
Section 12
46
Section 13
48
Section 14
50
Section 15
82
Section 16
86
Section 17
87
Section 18
88
Section 19
89

Section 9
19
Section 10
22
Section 11
40
Section 20
98
Section 21
132
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