Inclusion and Democracy

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2002 - Political Science - 304 pages
This controversial new look at democracy in a multicultural society considers the ideals of political inclusion and exclusion, and recommends ways to engage in democratic politics in a more inclusive way. Processes of debate and decision making often marginalize individuals and groups because the norms of political discussion are biased against some forms of expression. Inclusion and Democracy broadens our understanding of democratic communication by reflecting on the positive political functions of narrative, rhetorically situated appeals, and public protest. It reconstructs concepts of civil society and public sphere as enacting such plural forms of communication among debating citizens in large-scale societies. Iris Marion Young thoroughly discusses class, race, and gender bias in democratic processes, and argues that the scope of a polity should extend as wide as the scope of social and economic interactions that raise issues of justice. Today this implies the need for global democratic institutions. Young also contends that due to processes of residential segregation and the design of municipal jurisdictions, metropolitan governments which preserve significant local autonomy may be necessary to promote political equality. This latest work from one of the world's leading political philosophers will appeal to audiences from a variety of fields, including philosophy, political science, women's studies, ethnic studies, sociology, and communications studies.
 

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User Review  - thcson - LibraryThing

Pretty good political theorizing in this book, although the author seems to drift from one topic to another without wrapping them up together at any point. The theories are of course very abstract but ... Read full review

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Contents

Introduction
5
1 Challenges for Democracy
5
2 Deep Democracy
5
3 The Approach of Critical Theory
10
4 Thematizing Inclusion
11
5 Situated Conversation
14
DEMOCRACY AND JUSTICE
16
1 Two Models of Democracy
18
3 Anticipating Authorization and Accountability
128
4 Modes of Representation
133
5 Special Representation of Marginalized Groups
141
6 Application of the Argument for Group Representation
148
CIVIL SOCIETY AND ITS LIMITS
154
1 The Idea of Civil Society
157
2 SelfOrganizing Civil Society
164
3 The Public Sphere
167

2 An Ideal Relation between Democracy and Justice
27
3 Ideals of SelfDetermination and SelfDevelopment
31
4 Democratic Theory for Unjust Conditions
33
5 Limitations of Some Interpretations of the Deliberative Model
36
INCLUSIVE POLITICAL COMMUNICATION
52
1 External and Internal Exclusion
53
2 Greeting or Public Acknowledgement
57
3 Affirmative Uses of Rhetoric
63
4 Narrative and Situated Knowledge
70
5 Dangers of Manipulation and Deceit
77
SOCIAL DIFFERENCE AS A POLITICAL RESOURCE
81
1 Critique of a Politics of Difference
83
2 Social Difference is not Identity
87
3 Structural Difference and Inequality
92
4 Social Groups and Personal Identity
99
5 What is and is not Identity Politics
102
6 Communication across Difference in Public Judgement
108
REPRESENTATION AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVE
121
1 Participation and Representation
124
2 Representation as Relationship
125
4 The Limits of Civil Society
180
5 Associative Democracy
188
RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION AND REGIONAL DEMOCRACY
196
1 Residential Racial Segregation
198
2 The Wrongs of Segregation
204
3 Residential Class Segregation
210
4 Critique of an I deal of Integration
216
Differentiated Solidarity
221
6 Local Participation and Regional Governance
228
SELFDETERMINATION AND GLOBAL DEMOCRACY
236
1 The NationState and Obligations of Justice
237
2 Transborder Justice and Global Governance
246
3 Recognition of Distinct Peoples without Nationalism
251
4 Rethinking SelfDetermination
255
5 Global Democracy
265
United Nations Reform
271
References
277
Index
295
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About the author (2002)


Iris Marion Young is Professor of Political Science at The University of Chicago. Her previous books include Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays in Feminist Philosophy and Social Theory, Justice and the Politics of Difference, Intersecting Voices: Dilemmas of Gender, Political Philosophy and Policy, and A Companion to Feminist Philosophy.

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