Insect Conservation Biology

Front Cover
Springer Netherlands, Nov 30, 1994 - Nature - 358 pages
0 Reviews
This book is a paperback reprint of a previously published hardback.
Insects are the major component of the world's biodiversity. By virtue of their vast numbers of both species and individuals, they are vital determinants of terrestrial ecological processes. Quantiatively, insects are important pointers for species-rich geographical areas. Qualitatively, they are also important, whether the subjects of conservation themselves or as tools for identifying biotic areas with high endemism.
Insect Conservation Biology covers a wide range of topics from single species to landscape conservation, and from rare butterflies to the benefits-and-risks of biocontrol agents. The approach is both positive and realistic, with insects being discussed in the contexts of sustainable development, agroecology and monitoring environmental change. Ethical issues surrounding insects are also considered as well as clear ecommendations for the future.
Conservation circles have given too little attention to the ecological significance of insects, while entomologists have been engaged mostly in controlling a tiny minority of species of insect pests. The realms of conservationists and entomologists are brought together in this ground-breaking book.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Michael Samways is Professor of Entomology in the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. He is internationally known as a conservation biologist and policy advisor.

Bibliographic information