Kill Chain: Drones and the Rise of High-Tech Assassins

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Verso Books, 2016 - Air warfare - 368 pages
Kill Chain is the essential history of drone warfare, a development in military technology that, as Andrew Cockburn demonstrates, has its origins in long-buried secret programmes dating to US military interventions in Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Cockburn follows the links in a chain that stretches from the White House, through the drone command center in Nevada, to the skies of Helmand Province.
The book reveals the powerful interests-military, CIA and corporate-that turned the Pentagon away from manned aircraft and boots on the ground to killing by remote control. Cockburn uncovers the technological breakthroughs, the revolution in military philosophy, and the devastating collateral damage resulting from assassinations allegedly targeted with pinpoint precision.
Vivid, powerful and chilling, Kill Chain draws on sources deep in the military and intelligence establishment to lay bare the failure of the modern American way of war.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - PJNeal - LibraryThing

An interesting contribution to the discussion around the Third Offset and the question of how (not if) humans will partner with machines on the battlefield. Drones are not a new concept, despite what ... Read full review

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User Review  - dandelionroots - LibraryThing

From WWII to Afghanistan, Cockburn documents the desire for and attempted implementation of a system that can remotely conduct surveillance and remove targets with "pinpoint accuracy". Also discusses ... Read full review

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About the author (2016)

Andrew Cockburn is the Washington Editor of Harper's magazine and the author of many articles and books on national security, including the New York Times Editor's Choice Rumsfeld and The Threat, which destroyed the myth of Soviet military superiority underpinning the Cold War. He is a regular opinion contributor to the Los Angeles Times and has written for, among others, the New York Times, National Geographic and the London Review of Books.

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