Lancashire and the New Liberalism

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 26, 2007 - History - 488 pages
0 Reviews
Why was there a Liberal Government in Britain from 1905 until the First World War? And why was the Liberal party replaced by the Labour party so shortly afterwards? These are the kinds of problems which Dr Clarke examines in his study of the Liberal revival in Lancashire. The vote in north-west England was largely responsible for bringing the Liberal Government into power and for maintaining its position, but it also produced almost half the new Labour MP's in 1906. Thus any satisfactory interpretation of electoral history in the early twentieth century must account for what happened in Lancashire. This book calls into question many of the conventional assumptions about British politics in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The politics of change
3
formative influences
25
Manchester School to Tory Democracy
27
The Conservative Party at prayer
53
Cotton
76
the terms of the contest
101
The pale of the Constitution
103
The politics of the street
130
Communal politics
249
The rise and fall of the Free Traders
274
Labour
311
GOING TO THE COUNTRY
341
The core of the argument
343
Vox populi
365
CONCLUSION
391
Edwardian Progressivism
393

THE RECONSTITUTION OF LIBERAL LANCASHIRE
151
P Scott and Progressivism
153
The sinews of war
198
Men of light and leading
220
FIELDS OF RECRUITMENT
247
A Voting in the north west
411
B The franchise
427
F Max Aitken and the Ashton Trades Council December 1910
437
Index
454
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information