Liverpool

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Yale University Press, 2004 - Architecture - 332 pages
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This comprehensive, full-color guidebook describes all the architecturally significant buildings in Liverpool, the city selected as European Capital of Culture for 2008. The book includes suburban areas of interest and excursions to notable sites farther out. Major buildings--such as the Town Hall, St George's Hall, and the two Cathedrals--receive extended treatment; the streets of the business district are dealt with alphabetically; and the rest of the city--including the docks--is covered in a series of carefully planned walks.
Based on Nikolaus Pevsner's original text for the Buildings of England, the book is augmented by close study of Liverpool's buildings themselves and by extensive new research. It is an authoritative work of reference as well as a practical handbook for visitors and residents walking in the city.
 

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Contents

III
42
IV
49
V
60
VI
67
VII
73
VIII
83
IX
91
X
93
XVIII
229
XIX
251
XX
258
XXI
269
XXII
276
XXIII
295
XXIV
296
XXV
299

XI
103
XII
121
XIII
131
XIV
173
XV
174
XVI
192
XVII
210
XXVI
302
XXVII
304
XXVIII
307
XXIX
313
XXX
322
XXXI
332
Copyright

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Page 17 - Among the great cities of the world, of first or second rank, there is no other so exclusively devoted to commerce. Every house in Liverpool is either a counting-house, a warehouse, a shop, or a house that in one way or other is either an instrument or the result of trade. The great buildings and institutions of the town are a custom-house, an exchange, a set of docks, a railway station, or something else that is intended, directly or indirectly, to be serviceable to commerce, and the inhabitants...
Page 7 - In a word, there is no town in England, London excepted, that can equal Liverpoole for the fineness of the streets, and beauty of the buildings...
Page 11 - Annals of Science, xxviii (1972), 61-86. 93. L. Simond, An American in Regency England ed. C. Hibbert (London, 1968), 70. There was a contrary view as well. Liverpool was 'the only town in England of any pre-eminence that has not one single erection or endowment for the advancement of science, the cultivation of the arts, or promotion of useful knowledge...
Page 10 - The Social Geography of Merseyside in the Nineteenth Century', Final report to the Social Science Research Council, July 1976 (Dept of Geography, University of Liverpool); See also JD Papworth, 'The Irish in Liverpool 1835-71: Segregation and Dispersal' (unpublished PhD thesis, University of Liverpool, 1982).
Page 6 - Mersy [Mersey], mostly new built houses of brick and stone after the London fashion; the first original was a few fishermens houses and now is grown to a large fine town and but a parish and one Church, tho...

About the author (2004)

Joseph Sharples is an architectural historian in the history department of the University of Liverpool.

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