Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market

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Cosimo, Inc., Dec 1, 2007 - Business & Economics - 404 pages
3 Reviews
Much of what we consider modern economics is the work of British journalist and economist Walter Bagehot, one of the first editors of the influential newspaper The Economist and an early proponent of business cycles. Here, he develops his theory of central banking, much of which continues to impact financial thinking today. First published in 1873, this replica of the updated 1910 edition explores the history of London's Lombard Street, from how it came to be the traditional home of banks and moneylenders to how the value of money was determined by the institutions there. Joint stocks, private banking, and the regulation of the banking reserve: Bagehot's discussion of these fundamental economic issues makes this a vital resource for anyone wishing to understand financial history. WALTER BAGEHOT (1826-1877) also wrote The English Constitution (1867), Physics and Politics (1872), and The Postulates of English Political Economy (1885), among other works.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - justindtapp - LibraryThing

Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market by Walter Bagehot (1873, reprinted by Project Gutenberg). This is the original book about bank runs, financial crises, and the role of a central bank ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - justindtapp - LibraryThing

Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market by Walter Bagehot (1873, reprinted by Project Gutenberg). This is the original book about bank runs, financial crises, and the role of a central bank ... Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
21
VI
77
VII
103
VIII
115
IX
124
X
162
XI
210
XIV
283
XV
303
XVI
331
XVII
337
XIX
339
XX
352
XXI
362
XXII
365

XII
245
XIII
269

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Page 4 - Street is to say that it is by far the greatest combination of economical power and economical delicacy that the world has ever seen.
Page 11 - English commerce is the secret of its life ; for it contains the " propensity to variation," which, in the social as in the animal kingdom, is the principle of progress.

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