Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast

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D & M Publishers, Sep 1, 2009 - Art - 111 pages
Bold, inventive indigenous art of the Northwest Coast is distinguished by its sophistication and complexity. It is also composed of basically simple elements which, guided by a rich mythology, create images of striking power.

In Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast, Hilary Stewart introduces the elements of style; interprets the myths and legends which shape the motifs; and defines and illustrates the stylistic differences between the major cultural groupings.

Raven, Thunderbird, Killer Whale, Bear: all the traditional forms are here, deftly analyzed by a professional writer and artist who has a deep understanding of this powerful culture.
 

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User Review  - maggie1944 - LibraryThing

I found this book to be very helpful in looking at the art of the pacific northwest coast native populations. I appreciated the deconstruction which helped me identify various animals found in some of the more abstract pieces. I recommend this book highly. Read full review

Contents

The Twodimensional Art
15
The Basic Components
19
Inner Ovoid
20
S Form
22
Anatomical Features
25
Nose
26
Arms Legs Hands Feet Claws
28
Bird Feathers Tails and Wings
30
Owl
64
Thunderbird
65
Frog
68
Sisiutl
70
Salmon
72
Dogfish
74
Halibut
76
Red Snapper
78

Structural Variations
33
Transformation Figures
34
A Design Fitted to a Given Shape
36
Identification of Design Motifs
41
Whale
42
Bear
43
Wolf
46
Mountain Goat
48
Beaver
50
Sea Lion
52
Seal
53
Eagle
54
Raven
57
Hawk
60
Hummingbird
62
Loon
63
Bullhead
79
Sea Monster
80
Mosquito
81
Sun
82
Moon
84
Box Designs
86
Human
88
Cultural Styles
91
West Coast Nootka
94
Kwagiutl
97
Ksan
100
Haida
104
Tlingit
107
Bibliography
110
Index of Artists
111
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Hilary Stewart is an award-winning author best known for her books on Northwest Coast First Nations cultures. She has also been involved in teaching outdoor education and wilderness survival courses for many years, as well as studying the ethnobotany of the coast First Nations, and has an extensive practical experience in the use of plants. She lives on Quadra Island in British Columbia.

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