Memoirs of the War in Spain, from 1808 to 1814, Volume 2

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H. Colburn, 1829 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814
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Page 424 - ... mind cannot divest itself of feelings of abhorrence towards the individual who directed them ; or, otherwise, were the subject coolly and dispassionately considered, the censure would be equally divided between the aggressors, and the commander of the suffering party. It is the paramount duty of every general to use every means in his power to bring his operations to a successful termination, and to preserve the lives of his own men ; and there seems no other such effectual mode of preventing...
Page 424 - The effects of the liquor now began to show itself, and some of the scenes which ensued are too dreadful and disgusting to relate ; where two or three thousand armed men, many of them mad drunk, others depraved and unprincipled, were freed from all restraint, running up and down the town, the atrocities which took place may be readily imagined ; but in justice to the army, I must say they were not general, and in most cases perpetrated by cold-blooded villains, who were backward enough in the attack....
Page 95 - Our fire ceased, and that of the enemy redoubled at the sight of our brave men, who issued from the trenches, ran over an uncovered space of sixty toises, and dashed on the breach. 2. Large aloes forming a line, at the distance of ten fathoms from the wall, forced the head of our column to turn aside.
Page 424 - ... full of it; and so much was spilt here, that some, it was said, were actually drowned in it. Farther on a number of those who had visited the spirit store were firing away their ammunition, striving to hit some bells in front of a convent. The effects of the liquor now began to show itself, and some of the scenes which ensued are too dreadful and disgusting to relate ; where two or three thousand armed men, many of them mad drunk, others depraved and unprincipled, were freed from all restraint,...
Page 136 - ... accede to the simple and reasonable demands of the Commander-in-Chief. All present danger will thus be averted, and the future will be secured against any similar disturbance of the peace. 68. Count de Courcy to Commissioner Yeh Macao, November 5, 1856 I have just received the despatch [not included] which Your Excellency has done me the honour of addressing to me in reply to my communication of the 26th ultimo. posted up on the walls of the town on the 1st and 3rd of this month. The former promises...
Page 425 - ... place may be readily imagined ; but in justice to the army, I must say they were not general, and in most cases perpetrated by cold-blooded villains, who were backward enough in the attack. Many risked their lives in defending helpless females; and although it was rather a dangerous place for an officer to appear, I saw many of them running as much risk to prevent inhumanity, as they did the preceding night in storming the town.
Page 425 - ... and some of the scenes which ensued are too dreadful and disgusting to relate ; where two or three thousand armed men, many of them mad drunk, others depraved and unprincipled, were freed from all restraint, running up and down the town, the atrocities which took place may be readily imagined ; but in justice to the army, I must say they were not general, and in most cases perpetrated by cold-blooded villains, who were backward enough in the attack. Many risked their lives in defending helpless...
Page 466 - Copy of a Letter from the Minister for foreign Relations to Count Lauriston. — Thorn, June 12, 1812. You have seen, Count, by the letter which I had the honour to write to you on the 20th of last month, that the declaration made by Prince Kurakin, on the 30th of April, and the repeated demand of his passports, had appeared to his Majesty such proceedings, so strong, so decisive in the existing circumstances, so contrary to the language which this Ambassador had held till then...
Page 95 - ... and grenades ; and, supported by the warmest fire of musketry, they repulsed the assailants, the foremost of whom tottered upon a moving soil, which gave way under their feet A shower of case-shot poured upon the head of the column. For a moment fortune seemed to waver. The commander-in-chief ordered a reserve to be brought up, all his aides de-camp rushed forward ; a battalion of officers hastened up.
Page 424 - There is something so exceedingly revolting in the picture of these severities, that the mind cannot divest itself of feelings of abhorrence towards the individual who directed them ; or, otherwise, were the subject coolly and dispassionately considered, the censure would be equally divided between the aggressors, and the commander of the suffering party. It is the paramount duty of every general to use every means in his power to bring his operations to a successful termination, and to preserve...

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