Militant Christianity: An Anthropological History

Front Cover
Palgrave Macmillan, Nov 9, 2012 - Religion - 194 pages

Today's militant Christians follow an ancient ethos we can trace four thousand years to the Battle-ax culture of early Indo-Europeans. Roman Emperor Constantine, from a Germanic background, approved Christianity in AD 312, believing it promised he would be 'the Anointed' greatest emperor. His Indo-European militarism characterized northern European Christianity, through Martin Luther's and John Calvin's aggressive Protestantism, American colonization ruthlessly dispossessing Indian nations, rise of competitive capitalism, to contemporary White American Protestants fighting to make America an officially Christian nation. Taking a broad anthropological approach, Militant Christianity is a new insight into the culture of 'Christian Warriors.'

 

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Contents

Cultural Traditions
1
The Pagan Christian Icon
5
IndoEuropean Christianity The Foundation
11
Europes Pagan Christianity
21
Protestantism Fits the State
35
Capitalism
45
Antebellum America
55
Manifest Destiny
67
Assault on the Secular Nation
97
Interlocking Directorates Business and Politics
111
Fortifying the Home Front
125
Evolving Tradition Resilient Backlash
143
Conclusion The Culture of Militant Christianity
155
Notes
161
References by Chapter
171
References
175

Hegemony through Philanthropy
75
Secularism Threatens
87

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About the author (2012)

Alice Beck Kehoe is a former professor of Anthropology at Marquette University. Among her publications are North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account (1981, third edition 2006); The Ghost Dance: Ethnohistory and Revitalization (2nd ed., 2006); Land of Prehistory: A Critical History of American Archaeology (1998); Shamans and Religion (2000); America Before the European Invasions (2002); Controversies in Archaeology (2008); and Expanding Anthropology 1945-1980 (edited with P. L. Doughty, 2011). Her research also includes archaeological and ethnographic fieldwork on the Northwestern Plains, ethnographic fieldwork in an Aymara Indian village in Bolivia, and continued collaboration with Amskapi Pikuni, Blackfeet Reservation, Montana, for whom she prepared a history, Amskapi Pikuni: The Blackfeet People (2012).