Nice Girls and Rude Girls: Women Workers in World War I

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I.B.Tauris, Apr 22, 2000 - Social Science - 256 pages
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Drawing on official records, contemporary writing and oral history, Deborah Thom examines the myth and reality of women's "experience of war." She shows that before 1914 they were often supporting dependants who had acquired considerable industrial experience and that women's trade activity was growing. The war showed that women were capable of a variety of tasks and they made great sacrifices and contributions massively to the war effort. The effect of war-work has underlined women's positions by their gender; they had changed but not improved their working lives.
 

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Contents

Introduction
iii
Women and Work in Wartime Britain
24
A Revolution in the Workplace? Womens Work in Munitions Factories and Technological Change 19141918
53
Free From Chains? The Image of Womens Labour in London 190020
78
The Bundle of Sticks Women Trade Unionists and Collective Organisation Before 1918
94
TNT Poisoning and the Employment of Women Workers in the First World War
122
Tommys Sister Women in World War I
144
The Mother Heart Welfare and the Underpinning of Domesticity
164
Passengers for the War
187
Conclusion the History of the History of Women and the War
201
Bibliography
209
Index
219
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About the author (2000)

Deborah Thom teaches at Robinson College, Cambridge.

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