No Virtue Like Necessity: Realist Thought in International Relations Since Machiavelli

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Yale University Press, 2002 - Political Science - 260 pages
A comprehensive history of the development of realist ideas in international relations throughout the last 500 years. Jonathan Haslam focuses on the emergence and relevance of realist (or statist) thought, showing how it has shaped political thinking and international events since Machiavelli's time. Haslam draws on an array of original texts in various European languages to illustrate the views of rulers and thinkers, to reveal how wars and other crises affected the thinking of those who experienced them, and to locate realist thinking squarely within the history of political and economic thought.
 

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Contents

REASONS OF STATE
17
THE BALANCE OF POWER
89
THE BALANCE OF TRADE
128
GEOPOLITICS
162
FROM REALPOLITIK TO NEOREALISM
183
Conclusion THE RELEVANCE OF REALISM
247
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About the author (2002)

Jonathan Haslam is Reader in the history of international relations at Cambridge University, and fellow and director of studies in history at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.

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