Ozu

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University of California Press, 1977 - Performing Arts - 275 pages
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"Substantially the book that devotees of the director have been waiting for: a full-length critical work about Ozu's life, career and working methods, buttressed with reproductions of pages from his notebooks and shooting scripts, numerous quotes from co-workers and Japanese critics, a great many stills and an unusually detailed filmography." --Sight and Sound

Yasujiro Ozu, the man whom his kinsmen consider the most Japanese for all film directors, had but one major subject, the Japanese family, and but one major theme, its dissolution. The Japanese family in dissolution figures in every one of his fifty-three films. In his later pictures, the whole world exists in one family, the characters are family members rather than members of a society, and the ends of the earth seem no more distant than the outside of the house.
 

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Contents

stationary camera the lowcamera position pictorial
105
EDITING
112
The form of the finished Ozu film circular form in
159
The experience of the Ozu film the transcendence of
186
BIOGRAPHICAL FILMOGRAPHY
193
NOTES
253
BIBLIOGRAPHY
265
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About the author (1977)

Donald Richie (April 17, 1924 - February 19, 2013) was an American-born author who wrote about the Japanese people, the culture of Japan, and especially Japanese cinema.

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