Parenting: What Really Counts?

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Psychology Press, 2000 - Family & Relationships - 124 pages
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Parenting: What Really Counts? examines the scientific evidence on what really matters for children's healthy psychological development.
The first section considers whether it is necessary to have two parents, a father present, parents who have a genetic link with their child, or parents who are heterosexual. Section two explores the psychological processes that underlie optimal development for children, particularly the quality of the child's relationship with parents, other family members and the wider social world. Contrary to common assumptions, Susan Golombok concludes that family structure makes little difference to children's day-to-day experiences of life.
As well as for students, researchers and teachers, Parenting: What really counts? will be of great interest to parents and those thinking of embarking on a non-traditional route to parenthood. It will also be welcomed by professionals working with families and those involved in the development of family policy.
 

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Contents

Number of parents one versus two?
3
Fathers present or not?
14
Genetic ties related or not?
24
Parents sexual orientation heterosexual or homosexual?
45
Family relationships
61
Quality of relationships between parents and children
63
Quality of marriage and parents psychological state
75
Childrens individual characteristics and their wider social world
88
Parenting what really counts?
99
Notes
105
Names index
119
Subject index
121
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About the author (2000)

Susan Golombok is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Family and Child Psychology Research Centre at City University, London. She is a leading international authority on the effects of non-traditional families on children's development.

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