Peace: A History of Movements and Ideas

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 24, 2008 - Religion
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Veteran scholar and peace activist David Cortright offers a definitive history of the human striving for peace and an analysis of its religious and intellectual roots. This authoritative, balanced, and highly readable volume traces the rise of peace advocacy and internationalism from their origins in earlier centuries through the mass movements of recent decades: the pacifist campaigns of the 1930s, the Vietnam antiwar movement, and the waves of disarmament activism that peaked in the 1980s. Also explored are the underlying principles of peace - nonviolence, democracy, social justice, and human rights - all placed within a framework of 'realistic pacifism'. Peace brings the story up-to-date by examining opposition to the Iraq War and responses to the so-called 'war on terror'. This is history with a modern twist, set in the context of current debates about 'the responsibility to protect', nuclear proliferation, Darfur, and conflict transformation.
 

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Contents

What is peace?
1
Movements
23
The first peace societies
25
Toward internationalism
45
Facing fascism
67
Debating disarmament
93
Confronting the cold war
109
Banning the bomb
126
A force more powerful
211
Democracy
233
Social justice
260
Responsibility to protect
279
A moral equivalent
302
Realizing disarmament
321
Realistic pacifism
334
Bibliography
340

Refusing war
155
Religion
183

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Page 11 - Aspiring sincerely to an international peace based on justice and order, the Japanese people forever renounce war as a sovereign right of the nation and the threat or use of force as means of settling international disputes. In order to accomplish the aim of the preceding paragraph, land, sea, and air forces, as well as other war potential, will never be maintained. The right of belligerency of the state will not be recognized.

About the author (2008)

David Cortright is President of the Fourth Freedom Forum and Research Fellow at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame.