Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change what We Think and Do

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Morgan Kaufmann, 2003 - Computers - 283 pages
4 Reviews
Can computers change what you think and do? Can they motivate you to stop smoking, persuade you to buy insurance, or convince you to join the Army?

"Yes, they can," says Dr. B.J. Fogg, director of the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford University. Fogg has coined the phrase "Captology"(an acronym for computers as persuasive technologies) to capture the domain of research, design, and applications of persuasive computers.In this thought-provoking book, based on nine years of research in captology, Dr. Fogg reveals how Web sites, software applications, and mobile devices can be used to change people's attitudes and behavior. Technology designers, marketers, researchers, consumers—anyone who wants to leverage or simply understand the persuasive power of interactive technology—will appreciate the compelling insights and illuminating examples found inside.

Persuasive technology can be controversial—and it should be. Who will wield this power of digital influence? And to what end? Now is the time to survey the issues and explore the principles of persuasive technology, and B.J. Fogg has written this book to be your guide.

* Filled with key term definitions in persuasive computing
*Provides frameworks for understanding this domain
*Describes real examples of persuasive technologies
 

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User Review  - Pivo1 - LibraryThing

This book is highly recommended for anyone doing interface design. Fogg essentially defines a whole new discipline in one single volume. In painstaking detail, he describes a myriad of issues ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Persuasion in the Digital Age
1
Persuasion on the Web
2
The Emergence of Captology
5
Interactivity
6
Advantages over Human Persuaders
7
2 Computers Allow Anonymity
8
4 Computers Can Use Many Modalities
9
5 Computer Software Can Scale
10
Operant Conditioning in Computer Games
51
Shaping Complex Behaviors
53
Notes and References
54
Computers as Persuasive Media Simulation
61
Persuading through Computer Simulation
62
Offering Exploration and Insight
63
A CauseandEffect Simulator
64
Learning Social Skills
66

How to Read This Book
11
Notes and References
12
Overview of Captology
15
Focus on the HumanComputer Relationship
16
Macro and Micro
17
Microsuasion on the Web
19
Summary of Key Terms and Concepts
20
Applying the Functional Triad to Captology
27
Notes and References
29
Computers as Persuasive Tools
31
Seven Types of Persuasive Technology Tools
32
Persuading through Simplifying
33
Guided Persuasion
34
Persuasion through Customization
37
Ethical Concerns
40
Intervening at the Right Time
41
Timing Is Critical
43
Taking the Tedium Out of Tracking
44
Eliminating a Language Quirk
45
Persuasion through Observation
46
Surveillance Must Be Overt
47
Rewarding through Surveillance
48
Public Compliance without Private Acceptance
49
Technology Applications of Operant Conditioning
50
Implications of Designer Bias
67
Creating Spaces for Persuasive Experiences
69
Competing in a Virtual Environment
70
Managing Asthma in a Simulated Environment
72
Using Simulation to Overcome Phobias
74
Helping Doctors to Empathize with Cancer Patients
76
Providing Experiences in Everyday Contexts
77
An Infant Simulator
78
Drunk Driving Simulator
79
Notes and References
82
Computers as Persuasive Social Actors
89
Credibility and Computers
121
Credibility and the World Wide Web
147
Increasing Persuasion through Mobility and Connectivity
183
The Ethics of Persuasive Technology
211
Captology Looking Forward
241
Looking Forward Responsibly
250
Notes and References
251
Summary of Principles
255
Figure Credits
263
Index
267
About the Author
283
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

B.J. Fogg directs research and design at Stanford University's Persuasive Technology Lab. An experimental psychologist, Dr. Fogg also teaches in Stanford's Department of Computer Science and School of Education. He holds several patents, and his work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal.

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