Play, Dreams and Imitation in Childhood

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Psychology Press, 1999 - Psychology - 296 pages
"Piaget's work is a cornerstone in development. His writing is long and laborious. He takes six pages to tell us that a 2 month old exhibits imitation behaviors. He was not an expert in parsimony. In his defense the translation from French is a bit awkward. What French I can read, of his work it is smoother than this translation. Case study gold, quoted as fact as if he had done something more significant than watch his own children and write down their behavior. No experimentally designed trials here. It's funny the same people and institutions who tout his great methods of research criticize Freud for his exact same research method: the case study. Many devout Piaget loyalists have never even read his original work. They've only been exposed to his work by text books in class. For this reason alone, I urge everyone to read as much source material as possible. Piaget is no exception. Get it, read it, make your own interpretation. Love it or hate it, you'll be wiser for the effort"--Amazon.com.
 

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Contents

AUTHORS PREFACE
1
Imitation of movements
30
Beginnings of representative
62
THE BEGINNINGS OF PLAY
89
CLASSIFICATION OF GAMES AND THEIR Evolu
105
EXPLANATION OF PLAY
147
SECONDARY SYMBOLISM IN PLAY DREAMS
169
Part ThreeCognitive Representation
213
FROM PRACTICAL TO REPRESENTATIVE
245
From sensorymotor intelligence to cognitive
262
GENERAL TRENDS OF REPRE
273
INDEX
292
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Jean Piaget, a Swiss psychologist, whose original training was in the natural sciences, spent much of his career studying the psychological development of children, largely at the Institut J.J. Rousseau at the University of Geneva, but also at home, with his own children as subjects. The impact of this research on child psychology has been enormous, and Piaget is the starting point for those seeking to learn how children view numbers, how they think of cause-and-effect relationships, or how they make moral judgments. Piaget found that cognitive development from infancy to adolescence invariably proceeds in four major stages from infancy to adolescence: sensory-motor, preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational. Each of these stages is marked by the development of cognitive structures, making possible the solution of problems that were impossible earlier and laying the foundation for the cognitive advances of the next stage. He showed that rational adult thinking is the culmination of an extensive process that begins with elementary sensory experiences and unfolds gradually until the individual is capable of dealing with imagined concepts, that is, abstract thought. By learning how children comprehend the world and how their intellectual processes mature, Piaget contributed much to the theory of knowledge as an active process in which the mind transforms reality. Put simply, Piaget described children from a perspective that no one before had seen.