Playing The Akai EWI5000 Electronic Wind Instrument (2015-10-16)

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sOnit, Incorporated, Jan 10, 2015 - Music - 199 pages

This book is for the amateur musicians who are interested in electronic wind instruments in general and the Akai EWI5000 in particular. It explains the functions of the EWI’s various sensors, synthesiser components, audio effects, and external connections. It gives a visual map of the EWI’s maze-like menus, and shows how to configure the hardware parameters. And it describes the similarities and the differences between the EWI and the traditional wind instruments. But this book is not meant to replace the official Akai publications. It is also not a tips-and-tricks book that teaches you how to make fancy balloon animals out of the EWI, and it is not an instruction book that teaches you music theory fundamentals. It is focused on the technical information about the EWI, the sort of information not found in the official manuals, the sort of information you can use to decide whether the EWI is right for you if you have not already purchased one, the sort of information you can use to explore the numerous musical possibilities if you did purchase one.

2015-10-16:

Fix error about conical and cylindrical bores

2015-05-26:

Distinguish perceptual terms from physical terms

Add to care and maintenance section a tip on fashioning a cheap, lightweight carrying case

2015-04-24:

Add explanation for room simulation reverb effect

Add description of DAC to audio connections section

Elaborate explanation of transposing instruments

Fix typographical and other minor errors

Fix ePub formatting error for Google Play

Update resources section

2015-04-16:

Reformat table of contents for better navigation

Add author contact information

2015-01-10:

Change fingering charts colour from black-on to blue-on for better visibility

2014-12-31:

Initial publication

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About the author (2015)

Amen Zwa is an ordinary bloke. He was born and raised in Burma. He now lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and son. He enjoys playing jazz with his son. He works as a technology consultant, focusing on business development, technology law, and algorithm design. His degrees are in law, computer science, and electrical engineering. In his spare time, Amen Zwa writes about law, technology, music, and motorsport.

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