Political Conduct

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 2007 - Philosophy - 283 pages
2 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
This book explores how the processes and practices of politics shape political values, such as liberty, justice, equality, and democracy. Mining the history of political episodes and political thinkers, including Caesar and Machiavelli, Mark Philp argues that it is through political activity that "values are articulated and embraced, and they become powerful motivating forces." Political Conduct is thus an attempt to inform and enrich political theory--to show that its principles would be more relevant to actual politics if they were immersed in history and practice. Philp argues for a separation between moral and political philosophy and proposes that a less abstract and ideal approach to political philosophy than that provided by Rawls, Dworkin, Nagel, and Cohen would be more useful in illuminating the conduct of politicians and the limitations on what they can achieve.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Philp's book offers a realist approach to the problems of political ethics with an admirable sensitivity to the complexities and ramifications of difficult political situations. It is one of the most inspiring pieces of contemporary political theory. If you like this stuff you should also check out Andrew Sabl's Ruling Passions. 

Contents

Introduction
1
Rendering unto Caesar
19
Machiavelli and Political Virtue
37
The Character of Political Rule
55
Resolved to Rule
76
Must Power Corrupt?
97
Loyalty in Politics
117
Officials and Public Servants
141
Resistance and Protest
169
Democratic Citizenship
193
Institutions and Integrity
214
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Mark Philp is former Head of the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford, and is a Fellow and Tutor in Politics at Oriel College, Oxford.

Mark Philp is former Head of the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford, and is a Fellow and Tutor in Politics at Oriel College, Oxford.

Bibliographic information