Political Machines: Governing a Technological Society

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A&C Black, Jul 23, 2001 - Political Science - 305 pages
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Technology assumes a remarkable importance in contemporary political life. Today, politicians and intellectuals extol the virtues of networking, interactivity and feedback, and stress the importance of new media and biotechnologies for economic development and political innovation. Measures of intellectual productivity and property play an increasingly critical part in assessments of the competitiveness of firms, universities and nation-states. At the same time, contemporary radical politics has come to raise questions about the political preoccupation with technical progress, while also developing a certain degree of technical sophistication itself.In a series of in-depth analyses of topics ranging from environmental protest to intellectual property law, and from interactive science centres to the European Union, this book interrogates the politics of the technological society. Critical of the form and intensity of the contemporary preoccupation with new technology, Political Machines opens up a space for thinking the relation between technical innovation and political inventiveness.>
 

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Contents

Technological zones
37
Harmonised states
62
On the network
85
Intellectual properties
104
On interactivity
127
Political chemistry
153
sites and sights
175
Political invention
197
Notes
216
Glossary of terms
268
Index
298
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About the author (2001)

Andrew Barry is Lecturer in Sociology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. He has published widely on technology, politics and social theory.