Post-Broadcast Democracy: How Media Choice Increases Inequality in Political Involvement and Polarizes Elections

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 2, 2007 - Political Science - 315 pages
The media environment is changing. Today in the United States, the average viewer can choose from hundreds of channels, including several twenty-four hour news channels. News is on cell phones, on iPods, and online; it has become a ubiquitous and unavoidable reality in modern society. The purpose of this book is to examine systematically, how these differences in access and form of media affect political behaviour. Using experiments and new survey data, it shows how changes in the media environment reverberate through the political system, affecting news exposure, political learning, turnout, and voting behavior.
 

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Contents

1
1
04
20
2
27
3
55
07
82
09
86
Measuring Political
92
4
94
5
142
6
163
05
189
05
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7
214
Selection Proportions in the
235
Table 72 The Effect of Cable Television on Correspondence of
241
Using a Selection
249

Political Knowledge Wave 2 FifteenItem Index
139
8
255

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About the author (2007)

Markus Prior is Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Politics at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford's Department of Communication in 2004. He is the author of Post-Broadcast Democracy (Cambridge University Press, 2007), an early version of which won the E. E. Schattschneider Award for the best dissertation in American politics, awarded by the American Political Science Association. The book examines how broadcast television, cable television and the internet have changed politics in the United States over the last half-century. His work has also appeared in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and Political Communication.

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