Predicates and Temporal Arguments

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Feb 10, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 176 pages
0 Reviews
A distinction is made in formal semantics between "stage-level predicates," predicates that describe the general state of a noun, and "individual-level predicates," predicates that specify the specific properties of a noun. Fernald investigates various contexts in which this distinction is traditionally said to come into play. His aim is to show that the effects displayed are not uniform, and that the differences between the analyses proposed in the literature arise from the authors considering different subsets of data that they take to exemplyify the "core" meaning of the stage/individual distinction. Fernald presents alternatives and extensions that shed light on the limitations of previous theories, as well as making original observations about important aspects of the topic, including coercion, and perceptual reports vs. other phenomena.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Predicates and Predicaments
3
Patterns of Interpretation and Grammaticality
12
Traditional Explanations
36
The Distinction and Its Slipperiness
63
Taking Stock
74
Nonuniformity
87
Of Time and Predicates
117
Notes
143
References
147
Index
153
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information