Private Power, Public Law: The Globalization of Intellectual Property Rights

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Cambridge University Press, 2003 - Business & Economics - 218 pages
Susan Sell's book shows how power in international politics in increasingly exercised by private interests rather than governments. In 1994 the WTO adopted the Agreement in Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), which dictated to states how they should regulate the protection of intellectual property. This book argues that TRIPS resulted from lobbying by powerful multinational corporations who wished to mould international law to protect their markets. It is a fascinating study of the influence of private interests in government decision-making, and in the shaping of the global economy.
 

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structured agent

Contents

Introduction
1
Structure agents and institutions
30
US intellectual property rights in historical perspective
60
The domestic origins of a tradebased approach to intellectual property
75
The Intellectual Property Committee and transnational mobilization
96
Life after TRIPS aggression and opposition
121
Conclusion structured agency revisited
163
References
189
Index
210
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Susan K. Sell is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The George Washington University. She is the author of Power and Ideas: The North-South Politics of Intellectual Property and Antitrust (1998).

Susan K. Sell is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The George Washington University. She is the author of Power and Ideas: The North-South Politics of Intellectual Property and Antitrust (1998).

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