The Problem of Translating "Jabberwocky": The Nonsense Literature of Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear and Their Spanish Translators

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Edwin Mellen Press, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 370 pages
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This book offers an analysis of nonsense literature in translation, examining specifically the way in which the works of Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear are conveyed and enjoyed by those of different linguistic, historical and cultural backgrounds. This work should appeal to scholars interested in British literature, nonsense literature, and translation theory. have never been out of print since they first appeared and have gone through numerous editions and translations in many major languages. The reality of this universal appeal is perplexing due to the fact that the nonsense literatures of both of these men are filled with historical allusions to and parodies of Victorian era England. Without an understanding of their historical background, one would assume that these works lose a considerable amount of their original appeal. international readership both in English and in translations. The purpose of this enquiry is to explore the many different ways in which nonsense has been translated. Once this is done, differences among translations of the same source text have to be observed and noted. At this stage, it may be appropriate to bring in external considerations of history, culture and publishers' intentions, which can suggest motivations for existing differences in approaches and techniques of translation.

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Contents

AN OVERVIEW OF THE CRITICAL LITERATURE
25
TOWARDS A DEFINITION OF NONSENSE
47
THE CORPUS AND THE METHODOLOGY
83
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Pilar Orero lectures at Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) where she also coordinates the Online Master in Audiovisual Translation.

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