Prostitution, Sexuality, and the Law in Ancient Rome

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Oxford University Press, 2003 - History - 416 pages
This is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution at Rome approximately from 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in this profession, with close attention to their social context. McGinn's unique study explores the "fit" between the law-system and the socio-economic reality while shedding light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, particularly that of women.
 

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Contents

Law in Society
3
The Status of Prostitutes and Pimps as Roman Citizens
21
Chapter 3 The Lex Iulia et Papia
70
Chapter 4 Emperors Jurists and the Lex Iulia et Papia
105
Chapter 5 The Lex Iulia de Adulteriis Coercendis
140
Chapter 6 Emperors Jurists and the Lex Iulia de Adulteriis Coercendis
216
Chapter 7 The Taxation of Roman Prostitutes
248
Restrictive Covenants in the Sale of Slaves
288
Chapter 9 Prostitution and the Law of the Jurists
320
Diversity and Unity in Roman Legal Perspectives on Prostitution
338
Bibliography
349
Index of Sources
391
Index of Persons
403
Index of Subjects
408
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About the author (2003)

Thomas A. J. McGinn is at Vanderbilt University.

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