Quasi-States: Sovereignty, International Relations and the Third World

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 18, 1993 - Law - 225 pages
2 Reviews
Robert Jackson examines the birth and survival of Third World nations since the end of the Second World War. He describes these countries as "quasi-states," arguing that they exist more by the support and indulgence of the international community than by the abilities and efforts of their own governments and peoples. He investigates the international normative framework that upholds sovereign statehood in the Third World. This he calls "negative sovereignty" and contrasts it with what he sees as the "positive sovereignty" that emerged in Europe along with the modern state. Within this structure, he examines how negative sovereignty arose, and its mechanisms and consequences for both international politics and the domestic conditions of quasi-states. He concludes by assessing the future of quasi-states and the institution of negative sovereignty.
 

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I think this book is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the politics of the developing countries and their foreign policies in the context of their neo-colonial dependency or quasi-state nature. An excellent book.

Contents

Acknowledgements Page
1
STATES AND QUAS ISTATES
13
A NEW S OVE REIGN TY REGIME
32
SOVE REIGN TY REGIMES IN HISTORY
50
IN DEPENDENCE BY RIGHT
82
SOWEREIGNTY AND DEVELOPMENT
109
SOWEREIGN RIGHTS VERSUS HUMAN RIGHTS
139
QUASISTATES AND INTERNATIONAL THEORY
164
CON CLUSION
189
Notes
203
Index
219
Copyright

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