Religion and Popular Music in Europe: New Expressions of Sacred and Secular Identity

Front Cover
Thomas Bossius, Andreas Häger, Andreas Hager, Keith Kahn-Harris
I.B.Tauris, Jul 15, 2011 - Music - 192 pages
0 Reviews
Music and religion have, throughout history, walked hand in hand. In the rites and rituals of small tribal religions, great world religions, and more recent New-Age and neo-heathen movements, different kinds of music have been used to celebrate the gods, express belief, and help believers get in contact with the divine. This innovative book focuses on how mainstream and counter-cultural groups use religion and music to negotiate the challenges of modernization and globalization in the European context: a region under-explored by existing literature on the subject. With its internal ethnic diversity, ever-expanding borders and increasing differentiation, Europe has undergone massive dislocation in recent years. The authors show that, in the midst of such change, rock, pop, and dance music may in their various forms be used by their practitioners as resources for new kinds of spiritual and religious identification, even as these forms are used as symbols of the deficiencies of secular society. Focusing on Christianity, Judaism, Islam and New Religious Movements, the book explores such topics as Norwegian Black Metal and Neo-paganism, contemporary Jewish Music in the UK, the French hip hop scene, the musical thinking of Muslim convert Cat Stevens/Yusuf Islam and European dance music culture. It offers an ideal introduction to leading-edge thinking at the exciting interface of "music and religion."
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Body
1
Back Matter
163

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Thomas Bossius is a Lecturer in Cultural Studies at the University of Gothenburg.

Andreas Hager is a Docent in Sociology of Religion at Abo Akademi University, Turku.

Keith Kahn-Harris is a Research Associate at the Centre for Urban and Community Research, Goldsmiths College, London, and author of Extreme Metal: Music and Culture on the Edge (2006).

Bibliographic information