Remembering: A Study in Experimental and Social Psychology

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 30, 1995 - Psychology - 317 pages
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In 1932, Cambridge University Press published Remembering, by the psychologist Frederic Bartlett. The landmark book described fascinating studies of memory and presented the theory of schema which informs much of cognitive science and psychology today. In Bartlett's most famous experiment, he had subjects read a Native American story about ghosts and had them retell the tale later. Because their backgrounds were so different from the cultural context of the story, the subjects changed details in the story that they could not understand. Besides containing important seminal concepts, Remembering is fascinating from an historical perspective. Bartlett discusses the ideas and research of Ebbinghaus, Freud, Jung, and Spearman. In addition, his comparison of Swazi African culture and British culture is a study in cross-cultural psychology that was ahead of its time.
 

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Contents

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES
1
Experiments on Perceiving
14
Experiments on Imaging
34
Experiments on Remembering
47
Experiments on Remembering
63
Experiments on Remembering
95
Experiments on Remembering
118
Experiments on Remembering
177
Meaning
227
REMEMBERING AS A STUDY IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
239
Social Psychology and the Matter of Recall
247
Social Psychology and the Manner of Recall
256
Conventionalisation
268
The Notion of a Collective Unconscious
281
The Basis of Social Recall
293
A Summary and Some Conclusions
301

Perceiving Recognising Remembering
186
A Theory of Remembering
197
Images and their Functions
215

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