Requirements Analysis: From Business Views to Architecture

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Prentice Hall Professional, 2003 - Computers - 458 pages
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This book is a compendium of the various analysis techniques that have developed over the last thirty years, organized in terms of an architectural framework. Each technique has a place in the framework, and this placement enables coherent comparison of them all, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each. Project development teams often spend too little time learning about the actual business problems a system must address. Without a clear understanding of these issues, organizations can easily develop off-target solutions, miss critical windows of opportunity, and get overrun by their competition. On the other hand, development teams that follow a proven process tend to get it right from the beginning, avoiding the costs of repairing or re-releasing software later in the life cycle. Requirements and Analysis is the process of defining your system. This involves obtaining a clear understanding of the problem space such as business opportunities, user needs, or the marketing environment and then defining an application or system to solve that problem. Rational Requirements and Analysis solutions help you build it right from the beginning. Foreword by Barbara von Halle, Spectrum Technology Group Inc.

 

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Contents

Chapter
1
Chapter
11
About Requirements Analysis
18
Define Scope
19
Plan the Process
20
Gather Information
21
Conduct Briefing
22
Joint Application Development JAD and Feedback Sessions
23
Determine Level of Technology
46
Identify Capacity Requirements
47
Deliverable Requirements Statement
48
Define Operating Environment
49
Define Technological Architecture
50
CHAPTER 3
57
Normalization
91
Data Modeling Conventions
112

Examine Current Systems
24
Describe the Enterprise
25
Define Data Models See Chapter 3
26
Define Activity Models See Chapter 4
27
Define Location Models See Chapter 6
30
Define Event and Timing Models See Chapter 7
32
Define Motivation Models See Chapter 8
33
Present Models
37
Deliverables Model Descriptions
39
Define What Is Required of a New System
40
Identify Required Capabilities
41
Identify Requirement Constraints
43
EntityRelationship Model Validation
131
Activities
141
People and Organizations
199
Conclusion
239
Locations
245
CHAPTER 7
255
Motivation
287
APPENDIX
343
The Business Rules Group Motivation Model
389
Bibliography
443
Index
449
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About the author (2003)

David C. Hay has been developing interactive, database-oriented systems since the days of punched cards, paper tape, and teletype machines. He is president of Essential Strategies, Inc., a Houston, Texas-based worldwide consultancy that uses modeling techniques to help construct information strategies and architectures, and defines requirements in a wide range of organizations, including pharmaceutical researchers, news-gathering and broadcasting firms, oil refiners, and government agencies.

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