Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility

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Cambridge University Press, 2000 - Law - 277 pages
This book provides a comprehensive, systematic theory of moral responsibility. The authors explore the conditions under which individuals are morally responsible for actions, omissions, consequences, and emotions. The leading idea in the book is that moral responsibility is based on "guidance control." This control has two components: the mechanism that issues in the relevant behavior must be the agent's own mechanism, and it must be appropriately responsive to reasons. The book develops an account of both components. The authors go on to offer a sustained defense of the thesis that moral responsibility is compatible with causal determinism. This major study will interest moral philosophers, legal theorists, and those in religious studies concerned with the issue of moral responsibility.

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Contents

Moral Responsibility The Concept and the Challenges
1
Moral Responsibility for Actions Weak ReasonsResponsiveness
28
Responsibility for Actions Moderate ReasonsResponsiveness
62
Responsibility for Consequences
92
Responsibility for Omissions
123
The Direct Argument for Incompatibilism
151
Responsibility and History
170
Taking Responsibility
207
Conclusion
240
Bibliography
261
Index
271
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