Security: A New Framework for Analysis

Front Cover
Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1998 - Political Science - 239 pages
6 Reviews
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Two schools of thought now exist in security studies: traditionalists want to restrict the subject to politico-military issues; while wideners want to extend it to the economic, societal and environmental sectors. This book sets out a comprehensive statement of the new security studies, establishing the case for the broader agenda.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DanielClausen - LibraryThing

One might think of this book as a key effort to mainstream constructivist analysis in IR and show how security (or securitization) is used as an alternative and extreme form of politics. Buzan, Waever ... Read full review

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This book gives me very good understanding of global security and help me to make my research proposal

Contents

Conceptual Apparatus
21
The Military Sector
49
The Environmental Sector
71
The Economic Sector
95
The Societal Sector
119
The Political Sector
141
How Sectors Are Synthesized
163
Conclusions
195
Bibliography
215
Acronyms
231
About the Book 239
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Barry Buzan is Montague Burton professor of international relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His numerous publications include People, States, and Fear: The National Security Problem in International Relations and (with Ole Wæver et al.) Identity, Migration, and the New Security Agenda in Europe.

Ole Wæver is professor of international relations and world politics at the University of Groningen. He is author (with Pim den Boer and Peter Brugge) of The History of the European Idea.

Jaap de Wilde is lecturer in international relations at the University of Twente (the Netherlands). He is author of Saved from Oblivion: Interdependence Theory in the First Half of the 20th Century and editor (with Hakan Wiberg) of Organized Anarchy: The Role of States and Intergovernmental Organizations.

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