Seeing Things: Television in the Age of Uncertainty

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I.B.Tauris, 2000 - Performing Arts - 193 pages
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Television, John Ellis argues, responds to two powerful desires of our age: it makes us witnesses to often traumatic events and it tries--and fails--to provide us with narratives that make sense of the world. In Seeing Things, Ellis makes sense of modern television, both by exploring its processes and in terms of its dynamic relationships with the cultures that provide it with raw material. Television, he proposes, gives us many different ways to understand the world but does not arbitrate between them. He explores this process as one of "working through," whereby television news takes in the chaos and conflict of the world and subsequent programs offer diverse ways of unraveling its confusions, from the psycho-babble of talk shows to the open narratives of soaps, documentaries and dramas. By means of this working through, problems are exhausted rather than resolved.

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Contents

A New Way of Perceiving the World
6
Witness Through the Twentieth Century
17
Scarcity
39
Availability
61
Television in the Age
74
Working Through and the Videographic
91
Working Through and the Genres of Television
102
Where Power Lies in Television
130
From OfferLed to DemandLed
148
Plenty
162
bibliography
179
Index
187
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News Culture
Allan
No preview available - 2004
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About the author (2000)

John Ellis runs an independent television production company and is also Reader at the School of Media Arts and Communication, Bournemouth University.

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