Silvicultural Systems

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, Aug 29, 1991 - Nature - 284 pages
0 Reviews
There is a rapid rate of forest clearance in many tropical countries. This problem is becoming more serious as the rising world population increases demand for fuelwood and timber. The reduced area of forest must be treated so as to produce the highest possible sustained yield of suitable timber compatible with protecting the environment and water supplies, conserving wild life, enhancing attractive scenery, and giving opportunities for recreation. In Europe complete regimes for regenerating, tending, and harvesting forests called "silvicultural systems" have provided effective solutions to these problems. These are being used successfully in temperate, sub-tropical, and tropical forestry, often under conditions very different from those in which they originated. This book describes the theoretical basis and practical application of 20 silvicultural systems so that foresters and other land managers, ecologists, and landscape designers can select and use those best suited to their needs.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
3
The protective functions of managed forests
22
Protecting forests against damage
30
The relation of silviculture to forest management
49
The clear cutting system
65
Shelterwood systems
90
S The uniform system
98
The group system
126
The selection system
163
The group selection system
174
Accessory systems
183
The coppice system
190
The coppice selection system
213
Conversion
225
Agroforestry systems
240
Appendices
258

The irregular shelterwood system
133
Strip systems
138
The tropical shelterwood system
152

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1991)

John D. Matthews is at University of Aberdeen.

Bibliographic information