Sketch of the natural history of Yarmouth and its neighbourhood, by C.J. and J. Paget

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Page viii - a spot more suitable to their (the wildfowls') habits than Breydon affords, consisting as it does of a sheet of water some miles in extent, with shallow borders, or flats (as they are called), and surrounded, almost as far as the eye can reach, by marshes. The water leaving its banks quite bare for a considerable extent at every ebbing of the tide, exposes an abundance of the small crustaceous animals and other food most congenial to the Duck tribe. Even in the severest winters it is seldom so completely...
Page xxix - ... probably no neighbourhood has been so completely investigated as this, which has had the good fortune to have been for nearly a century, the constant stage for the action of some inquiring mind.
Page ix - Thomas, who, one morning on awaking in his boat on the flats, saw not far from him a number of wildfowl sitting in a crowd close together on the ice. From the boat being nearly covered with snow, he had escaped their observation, while they were collecting in the night. He immediately fired (his gun carrying about a pound of shot), and with those killed outright and the wounded, which he and...
Page ix - ... escaping, the gunner may, in his flat-bottomed boat, approach within a comparatively short distance of them, by means of channels, made in the flats, and with a single discharge of his long gun, which moves on a swivel in the midships of his boat, may effect a most extraordinary slaughter.
Page xxiv - Higher up on the Denes, where occasional inundations of the river have left behind them particles of mud, and by the longer continuance of vegetable growth the fibrous matter of roots have been deposited, so as in some measure to enrich the soil, the herbage is rather more abundant. It is...
Page 9 - ... (Moore); Cockfield (CB !), and Gazeley (Tearle). It has been very rarely observed in the summer months, Mr. C. Girdlestone had one brought him in June, 1822 ; in June, 1824, he himself saw a pair on Bradwell common, and about two years after, another specimen was shot. Mr. Miller says he has had Jack's eggs brought to him, they were smaller and of a more elliptical shape than those of the Common Snipe, which they otherwise exactly resemble (Paget Y. 9). It is supposed to have bred at Oakley ;...
Page xxiii - ... with each other in every direction, effectually bind down the sand blown up from the beach; while the short strong foliage prevent its being blown over the land in the neighbourhood, which is thus maintained capable of high cultivation. The roots indeed of all the species here will be found...
Page viii - it would be difficult to imagine a spot more suitable to their habits than Breydon affords, consisting as it does of a sheet of water some miles in extent, with shallow borders, or flats (as they are called), and surrounded, almost as far as the eye can reach, by marshes. The water leaving its banks quite bare for a considerable extent at every ebbing of the tide, exposes an abundance of the small crustaceous animals and other food most congenial to the duck tribe. Even in the severest winters it...
Page xiv - ... the elder of whom was only twenty-two years of age at the date of its issue. The list of Birds was doubtless very complete at the time, as its compilers, in addition to their own observations, had the assistance of all their immediate predecessors and contemporaries ; they speak of Girdlestone's " union of first-rate sporting accomplishments with the greatest ardour in the pursuit," giving him " advantages which none here have since equalled," and of the value of his excellent practical notes...
Page iv - Along the coast to the north of the town, runs a range of low hills of blown sand, bound together by the creeping roots of...

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