Spiritualism and British Society Between the Wars

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Manchester University Press, Sep 2, 2000 - History - 294 pages
Historians of modern British culture have long assumed that under pressure from secular forces, interest in spiritualism had faded by the end of the Great War. Jenny Hazelgrove challenges this assumption and shows how spiritualism grew between the wars and became part of the fabric of popular culture. This book provides a fascinating and lively insight into an alternative culture that flourished--and continues to flourish--alongside more conventional outlets for spiritual beliefs and needs.
 

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Contents

Spiritualism after the Great War
13
Catholic connections
53
Virgin mothers and warrior maids
80
Possession dissociation and unseen enemies I 10
110
Mothers mediums and vampires
147
Frustration repression and deviant desire
172
The dual agenda of psychical research
193
Becoming a medium
235
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About the author (2000)

Jenny Hazelgrove is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham and Associate at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine.

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