Supplying War: Logistics from Wallenstein to Patton

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 15, 2004 - History - 313 pages
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Drawing on a very wide rang of unpublished and previously unexploited sources, Martin van Creveld examines the 'nuts and bolts' of war: namely, those formidable problems of movement and supply, transportation and administration, so often mentioned--but rarely explored--by the vast majority of books on military history. The result is a fascinating book that has something new to say about virtually every one of the most important campaigns wage in Europe during the last two centuries. Moreover, by concentrating on logistics rather than on the more traditional tactics and strategy, Dr. van Creveld is also able to offer a reinterpretation of the whole field of military history.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
5
III
17
IV
26
V
36
VI
40
VII
42
VIII
61
XXII
142
XXIII
148
XXIV
155
XXV
166
XXVI
175
XXVII
181
XXVIII
182
XXIX
192

IX
70
X
75
XI
82
XII
89
XIII
96
XIV
103
XV
109
XVI
113
XVII
118
XVIII
122
XIX
128
XX
134
XXI
138
XXX
199
XXXI
202
XXXII
206
XXXIII
216
XXXIV
227
XXXV
231
XXXVI
239
XXXVII
263
XXXVIII
265
XXXIX
277
XL
309
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About the author (2004)

Martin van Creveld is a Professor in the Department of History at the Hebrew University, Jersualem. His previous books include The Rise and Decline of the State (Cambridge, 1999), The Sword and the Olive: A Critical History of the Israeli Defense Force (2002), Air Power and Manoeuvre Warfare (2002) and Transformation of War (1991).

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