Supplying War: Logistics from Wallenstein to Patton

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 15, 2004 - History - 313 pages
Why did Napoleon succeed in 1805 by fail in 1812? Were the railways vital to Prussia's victory over France in 1870? Was the famous Schlieffen Plan militarily sound? Could the European half of World War II have been ended in 1944? These are only a few of the questions that form the subject matter of this meticulously researched, lively book. Drawing on a very wide range of unpublished and previously unexploited sources, Martin van Creveld examines the 'nuts and bolts' of war: namely, those formidable problems of movement and supply, transportation and administration, so often mentioned - but rarely explored - by the vast majority of books on military history. In doing so, he casts his net far and wide, from Gustavus Adolphus to Rommel, from Marlborough to Patton, subjecting the operations of each to a thorough analysis from a fresh and unusual point a view. The result is a fascinating book that has something new to say about virtually every one of the most important campaign waged in Europe during the past two centuries. Moreover, by concentrating on logistics rather than on the more traditional tactics and strategy, Dr van Creveld is able to offer a reinterpretation of the whole field of military history.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is a Review of the Only Parts I Read. Unfortunately, while I would have liked to review [and have the leisure to!] the entire work, the only comments I am appending are on Count Gustav's manoeuvres within the Rhineland.
It seems from the accompanying graphic that the good Count was actively seeking water: however, once obtained, he took the recourse. Thus the only weakness of these movements was the exact point when the decision to tip the scales was taken. At this precise moment, if it could be located in space/time, a weakness in these otherwise flawless movements generates itself.
and move zon.
 

Contents

I
1
II
5
III
17
IV
26
V
36
VI
40
VII
42
VIII
61
XXII
142
XXIV
148
XXV
155
XXVI
166
XXVII
175
XXVIII
181
XXIX
182
XXX
192

IX
70
X
75
XI
82
XII
89
XIII
96
XIV
103
XV
109
XVI
113
XVII
118
XVIII
122
XIX
128
XX
134
XXI
138
XXXI
199
XXXII
202
XXXIII
206
XXXIV
216
XXXV
227
XXXVI
231
XXXVII
239
XXXVIII
263
XXXIX
265
XL
277
XLI
309
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Martin van Creveld is a Professor in the Department of History at the Hebrew University, Jersualem. His previous books include The Rise and Decline of the State (Cambridge, 1999), The Sword and the Olive: A Critical History of the Israeli Defense Force (2002), Air Power and Manoeuvre Warfare (2002) and Transformation of War (1991).

Bibliographic information