Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust

Front Cover
Jewish Publication Society, 1980 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
15 Reviews
In this allegory, the author's reaction to the Holocaust, the animals of the forest are carried away, one type after another, by the Terrible Things, not realizing that if perhaps they would all stick together and not look the other way, such terrible things might not happen.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - engpunk77 - LibraryThing

What do you do when some people are taken away? Do you think yourself lucky that it wasn't you and go about your business? What happens when they come for you? There won't be anyone left to help you ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - capt.insaino - LibraryThing

This story is an allegory to the Holocaust. Creatures known as the Terrible Things take groups of animals just based off what they look like. The main character is a small rabbit who does not like ... Read full review

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About the author (1980)

Eve Bunting was born in 1928 in Maghera, Ireland, as Anne Evelyn Bunting. She graduated from Northern Ireland's Methodist College in Belfast in 1945 and then studied at Belfast's Queen's College. She emigrated with her family in 1958 to California, and became a naturalized citizen in 1969. That same year, she began her writing career, and in 1972, her first book, "The Two Giants" was published. In 1976, "One More Flight" won the Golden Kite Medal, and in 1978, "Ghost of Summer" won the Southern California's Council on Literature for Children and Young People's Award for fiction. "Smokey Night" won the American Library Association's Randolph Caldecott Medal in 1995 and "Winter's Coming" was voted one of the 10 Best Books of 1977 by the New York Times. Bunting is involved in many writer's organizations such as P.E.N., The Authors Guild, the California Writer's Guild and the Society of Children's Book Writers. She has published stories in both Cricket, and Jack and Jill Magazines, and has written over 150 books in various genres such as children's books, contemporary, historic and realistic fiction, poetry, nonfiction and humor.

Stephen Gammell is the winner of the Caldecott Medal for his drawings in Song and Dance Man by Karen Ackerman. His art in Where the Buffaloes Begin by Olaf Baker earned him a Caldecott Honor award, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, and a New York Times Best Illustrated Books award. Other books he has illustrated include Will's Mammoth by Rafe Martin, andDancing Teepees: Poems of American Indian Youth by Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve.

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