The Age of the Cloister: The Story of Monastic Life in the Middle Ages

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Hidden Spring, 2003 - History - 356 pages
Among the most beautiful, spiritual and evocative structures in stone ever built are the medieval monasteries of Europe. The importance of the monastic world, its ideas and ideals, to the rise of Western civilization is second to none. The age of the cloister offers a fascinating overview of the birth and flowering of monasticism, and describes in great detail the everyday monastic life and the faith, literature, economy, architecture and culture of countless monks, hermits, nuns, canons, friars and lay men and women spanning hundreds of years.
 

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Contents

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XXXVII
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About the author (2003)

Christopher Brooke, the former Dixie Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Cambridge University and a life fellow of Conville and Caius College, Cambridge, is a leading scholar of medieval history. He is a fellow of the British Academy and corresponding fellow of the Medieval Academy of America.

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