The Autobiography and Correspondence of Mary Granville, Mrs. Delany: With Interesting Reminiscences of King George the Third and Queen Charlotte, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 360 - Edward, Earl of Clarendon ; George, Duke of Albemarle ; William, Lord Craven ; John, Lord Berkeley ; Anthony, Lord Ashley; Sir George Carteret; Sir William Berkeley; and Sir John Colleton...
Page 199 - To many a Kitty, Love his car Will for a day engage, But Prior's Kitty, ever fair, Obtained it for an age ! And she is old enough to be pleased with the compliment.
Page 262 - Some testimonies of learned men, in favour of the intended edition of the Saxon Homilies, concerning the learning of the author of those homilies, and the advantages to be hoped for from an edition of them. In a letter from the publisher to a doctor in divinity...
Page 194 - ... that the king will see as few as he wishes at his court, particularly such as dare to think or speak truth. I dare not do otherwise...
Page 48 - ... service, although it might be difficult to see how their experience was improved by it. It was no uncommon thing for a commission to be obtained for a child in the cradle ; and when he came from college, the fortunate youth was at least a lieutenant of some standing, by dint of fair promotion. To sum up this catalogue of abuses, commissions were in some instances bestowed upon young ladies, when pensions could not be had. We...
Page 319 - Dean of Deny in 1724, and married in August, 1728, Anne, eldest daughter of the Right Hon. John Foster, Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. Lord Montjoy's ball, which was limited to twenty-four couple, who danced in turn, affords a good example to the ball-givers of the present day, where dancing is rendered the exception at balls, in consequence of the total disregard which is paid to the proportion between space and numbers. Dancing in 1731 appears to have been a real enjoyment, and an invitation...
Page 73 - ... for her. Yet still his pride struggled with his inclination ; for all this time she was engaged to sing in public, a circumstance very grievous to her, but urged by the best of motives, she submitted to it, in order to assist her parents, whose fortune was much reduced by Mr. Robinson's loss of sight, which deprived him of the benefit of his profession as a painter.
Page 283 - Hogarth has promised to give me some instructions about drawing that will be of great use, — some rules of his own that he says will improve me more in a day than a year's learning in the common way.
Page 35 - ... of all human probability, and all imaginable disadvantages, that as we cannot be forgetful of so great desert, so we cannot but desire to publish it to all the world, and perpetuate to all time the memory of their merits and of our acceptance of the same, and to that end we do hereby render...
Page 194 - That the Duchess of Queensberry is surprised and well pleased that the King hath given her so agreeable a command as to stay from Court, where she never came for diversion, but to bestow a great civility on the King and Queen...

Bibliographic information