The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2003 - Philosophy - 266 pages
6 Reviews
In this book Michel Foucault, one of the most influential thinkers of recent times, calls us to look critically at specific historical events in order to uncover new layers of significance. In doing so, he challenges our assumptions not only about history, but also about the nature of language and reason, even of truth. By analysing the methods of observation that underpinned the origins of modern medical techniques, Foucault is able to identify 'that opening up of the concrete individual, for the first time in Western history, to the language of rationality, that major event in the relationship of man to himself and of language to things'. The scope of such an undertaking is vast, but it is Foucault's skill that, by means of his uniquely engaging narrative style, his penetrating gaze is able to confront our own. After reading his words our perceptions are never quite the same again.

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Review: The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception

User Review  - Janine - Goodreads

This book is not interesting but enlightening. If you can get through it (which is tough and requires a clear alert mind and coffee) then it gives you a good understanding of how medicine has changed ... Read full review

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References to this book

The Absent Body
Drew Leder
Limited preview - 1990
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About the author (2003)

Foucault (1926-84) was one of the foremost thinkers of the twentieth century. He was part of the ultimate intellectual generation in France

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